Pakistan to stay on FATF ‘greylist’ over failure to convict UNSC-designated terror leaders

26th June,2021

Pakistan to stay on FATF ‘greylist’ over failure to convict UNSC-designated terror leaders


The Financial Action Task Force (FATF) has once again placed Pakistan on its greylist, or list of countries subject to "increased monitoring," after the Paris-based UN watchdog found it lacking in prosecuting the top leadership of UN Security Council-designated terror groups such as Lashkar-e Toiba, Jaish-e Mohammad, Al Qaeda, and the Taliban. The FATF announced the decision at the end of its most recent Plenary session, which was held virtually from June 21 to 25, saying that despite completing 26 of the 27 tasks assigned to it, Pakistan's failure to complete the final task on convicting terrorists and terror entities meant it would not be delisted for the time being. In addition, the FATF has issued a 6-point list of duties, primarily related to money laundering, that must be fulfilled. FATF President Marcus Pleyer said, "The FATF encourages Pakistan to continue to make progress toward addressing the one remaining Countering Finance of Terrorism (CFT)-related item as soon as possible by demonstrating that Terror Financing investigations and prosecutions target senior leaders and commanders of UN-designated terrorist groups." Pakistan is thought to have produced paperwork during the FATF hearings to indicate that it had prosecuted about 30 UNSC designated terrorists and their accomplices, prosecuting them in 70 terror funding cases, with convictions in about 50 of them. LeT head Hafiz Saeed and operations commander Zaki-ur Rehman Lakhvi, who are sought in India for the 26/11 Mumbai attacks, were recently convicted on terror funding charges. Masood Azhar, the leader of the JeM, has been charged with terror funding but has yet to be convicted. He is sought in India for a series of terror acts, including the Pathankot airbase attack and the Pulwama bombing. The majority of the cases have been dubbed a "eyewash" by MEA officials, who point out that many of the accusations and convictions were scheduled to coincide with key FATF sessions.