Joe Biden said he is completely stand behind the Afghanistan decision

17th Aug,2021

Joe Biden said he is completely stand behind the Afghanistan decision


He acknowledged that US President Joe Biden was behind the decision to withdraw US troops from Afghanistan on Monday, but acknowledged that the government had "gut-wrenching" images of the Taliban coming out of the country.
Mr Biden said he was faced with the possibility of withdrawing U.S. troops this year or adhering to a previously negotiated agreement to send thousands of service members back to Afghanistan for the "third decade" of the war.
Mr Biden said he would not repeat the mistakes he had made in the past and would not regret his decision to return. In a televised address to the nation from the White House East Room, Mr Biden said, "I fully stand behind my decision. 20 years later, I have learned hard that there is no better time to withdraw U.S. forces." Outraged, the Taliban finally seized control of the capital, Kabul, and the Afghan president left the country. Not interested in national security.
Mr Biden described the images coming out of Afghanistan - especially at the airport in Kabul, where Afghans were expected to flee the country - "gut-wrenching". Takeoff is widely advertised on the Internet. But he acknowledged that no American was wrong about how he executed the drawdown. And after dismissing the notion of a rapid takeover of the Taliban a month ago, Mr Biden admitted on Monday that "the truth is that it has come out faster than we expected. It will continue to support the people, move forward with regional diplomacy and speak out for Afghan rights. The U.S. military says a cargo plane has been killed, officials say in an anonymous state because they have no permission to openly discuss ongoing operations, with thousands of Afghans fleeing the Taliban's attempt to flee after coming to power and some sticking to a U.S. military plane before takeoff. The plane was seen crashing over Kabul A. U.S. forces fired warning shells and used helicopters to clear the route of transport planes. Mr Biden ordered another battalion of soldiers - about 1,000 - to secure the airfield, but the runway was closed on Monday due to civilians arriving and departing. . The pace of the fall of the Afghan government and the ensuing turmoil put Mr. Biden to the most serious test as commander-in-chief yet and came under heavy criticism from Republicans who said he had failed. Yet the president said the quick end to the Afghan government would only justify his decision, noting how Afghan forces had surrendered to the Taliban. "American soldiers cannot fight wars and Afghan forces cannot die in wars they do not want to fight for themselves," Mr Biden said. Mr Biden, who appears to be the most experienced foreign policy veteran of his decades-long career in the Senate as chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee, expressed confidence in his decision and said he wanted to take the heat. Ready, "He's very upset about the facts we are facing now, but I'm sorry for my decision." Mr Biden is the fourth U.S. president to face challenges in Afghanistan and insists he will not hand over America's long war to his successor. But he was pressured to explain how security could be resolved so quickly in Afghanistan, especially when he and others in the administration insisted it would not happen. "The jury is still out, but the Taliban are likely to seize all of them and are unlikely to own the entire country," Mr Biden said on July 8. Last week, however, administration officials spoke privately. Warnings that the military was disintegrating, Biden on Thursday ordered tens of thousands of U.S. troops in the area to expedite evacuation plans.