Joe Biden, Vladimir Putin set ‘consultations’ on updating nuclear pact

17th June,2021

Joe Biden, Vladimir Putin set ‘consultations’ on updating nuclear pact


Vladimir Putin said after the summit meeting Wednesday that there was "no hostility" during the talks that wrapped up more quickly than expected. In a "productive" summit, Russian President Vladimir Putin and US President Joe Biden agreed to restore ambassadors to their positions, reducing tensions and starting talks to replace the two countries' final surviving nuclear-weapons pact. After the summit meeting on Wednesday, Putin said there was "no animosity" throughout the talks, which ended sooner than planned. The two sides had agreed to meet for four to five hours, but they only spent less than three hours together, including an initial discussion with only the two presidents and their senior foreign aides. The Russian president stated that the two leaders had reached an agreement to return their ambassadors to their respective posts. As ties between the two nations cooled in recent months, both governments withdrew their senior envoys to Washington and Moscow. Anatoly Antonov, Russia's ambassador to the United States, was summoned from Washington about three months ago after Vice President Joe Biden called Putin a murderer; US Ambassador to Russia John Sullivan left Moscow almost two months ago after Russia requested that he return to Washington for consultations. The ambassadors are likely to return to their postings in the coming days, according to Putin. Putin also stated that the two sides had reached an agreement in principle to begin consultations on cybersecurity issues, though he denied US accusations that the Russian government was behind a series of high-profile hacks against businesses and government agencies in the United States and around the world. Biden and Putin held face-to-face discussions in a beautiful lakeside Swiss house on Wednesday, a highly anticipated meeting at a time when both presidents claim ties between their nations are at an all-time low. Biden described the meeting as a conversation between "two great powers" and said it was "always preferable to meet face to face" as the two leaders stood briefly before the media at the outset of the meeting. Putin expressed his hope that the discussions will be "fruitful." Both men appeared to avoid looking directly at each other during a brief and chaotic picture opportunity in front of a swarm of jostling media during the meeting in a book-lined room. When a reporter asked if Putin could be trusted, Biden nodded, but the White House swiftly responded with a tweet stating that he was “clearly not responding to any one question, but nodding in acknowledgement to the press generally.”