Imran Khan once again refuses to criticise Uighur mistreatment, claiming that Pakistan "accepts the Chinese version."

2nd July, 2021

Imran Khan once again refuses to criticise Uighur mistreatment, claiming that Pakistan "accepts the Chinese version."

PM Imran Khan stated in an interview on Thursday that the Chinese account of the Uighur issue differed from what was portrayed in the Western media. Imran Khan stated that Pakistan accepts the Chinese version. Because of Islamabad's "great proximity and relationship" with Beijing, Pakistan accepts the "Chinese version" of the treatment of Uighurs in Xinjiang region, according to Prime Minister Imran Khan. Imran Khan stated that the Chinese account of the Uighur issue differed significantly from what was presented in Western media. "We really accept the Chinese version because of our tremendous proximity and friendship with China," Imran Khan told a publication on Thursday. “It's a blatant display of hypocrisy. Other regions of the world are witnessing even greater human rights atrocities... "However, the Western media pays little attention to this," Imran Khan added. In an interview with an American news website, Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan similarly failed to denounce or recognise the repression and torture of the Muslim Uyghur population in China. "I'm not certain that's what's going on in China." In our discussions with China, they painted a different image of the situation. And whatever difficulties we have with the Chinese, we'll always talk with them behind closed doors," Imran Khan added. Imran Khan's comments follow the European Union, the United States, and other countries accusing China of genocide in Xinjiang against the Uighurs, a minority Muslim ethnic group. Researchers believe that over a million individuals, mostly Uighurs, have been incarcerated in re-education camps in China's western Xinjiang province in recent years. Forced labour, systematic forced birth control, torture, and the separation of children from imprisoned parents have all been alleged of Chinese officials. Meanwhile, China has denied reports that it had detained millions of Uigurs in vast detention centres. China accuses the East Turkistan Islamic Movement (ETIM), which is based in the Uighur Muslim-majority province of Xinjiang, of carrying out several violent assaults both inside and outside the province, including one in 2013 at Beijing's Forbidden City, which killed several people. Beijing has also chastised the United States for removing Xinjiang's separatist militant group from its list of terrorist organisations last year, claiming that it demonstrated Washington's "double standards" in the battle against global terrorism.