China cautions G7: ‘Small’ groups don’t rule the world

14th June,2021

China cautions G7: ‘Small’ groups don’t rule the world


The G7 are planning to offer developing nations an infrastructure scheme that could rival Xi's multi-trillion-dollar Belt and Road initiative. China warned Group of Seven leaders on Sunday that the days of "small" groupings of nations deciding the fate of the globe were long gone, rebuking the world's wealthiest democracies for seeking a single position over Beijing. “The days of a small handful of nations dictating global choices are long gone,” a spokeswoman for the Chinese embassy in London said. “We have always believed that all countries are equals, large or little, powerful or weak, poor or rich, and that international issues should be managed via dialogue among all countries.” Along with the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991, which ended the Cold War, the re-emergence of China as a key global power is regarded one of the most momentous geopolitical events of modern times. The G7 leaders, who are gathering in southern England, have been trying to come up with a clear answer to President Xi Jinping's rising assertiveness in the aftermath of China's stunning economic and military rise over the previous 40 years. The leaders of the group — the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Germany, Italy, France, and Japan — want to use their meeting in Carbis Bay, England, to demonstrate the world that the world's wealthiest democracies can provide an alternative to China's expanding might. On Saturday, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau chaired a Group of Seven debate on China, calling on leaders to come up with a cohesive response to the People's Republic's issues, according to a source. The G7 intends to provide poorer countries an infrastructure package that might compete with Xi's multibillion-dollar Belt and Road proposal. After years of humiliating China, Beijing has frequently retaliated against what it sees as Western attempts to restrict it, claiming that many major nations still have an antiquated colonial attitude.