Allahabad High Court orders protection for woman who converted from Islam to Hindu religion, married as per Hindu rites

27th May,2021

Allahabad High Court orders protection for woman who converted from Islam to Hindu religion, married as per Hindu rites

The Allahabad High Court on Wednesday ordered that a lady who converted from Islam to Hinduism and married according to Hindu ceremonies be protected by the police. After the woman complained about threats from her father, who objected to her conversion and marriage, the order was passed. The Senior Superintendent of Police, Meerut, has been ordered by Justice JJ Munir to "extend and provide necessary protection to the petitioners' life and limb" and to ensure that the woman and her husband are not harmed by any member of the woman's family, her native community, or the local police. "Based on the facts and circumstances, let notice be served on respondent no. 4 through the Chief Judicial Magistrate of Meerut, and a report on service be filed by the date set... It is also mentioned that the Senior Superintendent of Police, Meerut, should guarantee that the local police do not interfere in the petitioners' tranquil married life when operating on behalf of the 4th respondent (woman's father).
She was born a Muslim but had a strong belief in Hinduism, so she converted to Hinduism and took on a Hindu name, according to the Court. On April 15, she filed an application with the District Magistrate in Meerut, and the requisite news items were published in a newspaper, requesting that her name and religion be changed. On April 16, the woman married according to Hindu rites at the Arya Samaj Mandir, Maliyana, Meerut, and on the same day, she requested for their marriage to be registered with the Registrar of Marriages in Meerut. Their marriage, however, has not been registered as of yet, according to the Court. Meanwhile, the woman's father, enraged by the woman's conversion and marriage according to Hindu customs, sent death threats to the pair, according to the Court. The petitioners claimed that the woman's father and other family members, including members of the first petitioner's home community, pose a substantial threat to their lives. As a result, the Court ordered the family members not to enter the petitioners' home, including through friends, agents, or associates, or to approach the petitioners by any technological means of communication, or to hurt or injure the petitioners in any way. The petition was also served with notice, and the State authorities were given four weeks to file a counter-affidavit in the case. On June 23, the case will be heard again.