Delhi Police record request in Supreme Court against Delhi HC request giving bail to Asif Iqbal Tanha, Devangana Kalita, Natasha Narwal

16th June,2021


Delhi Police record request in Supreme Court against Delhi HC request giving bail to Asif Iqbal Tanha, Devangana Kalita, Natasha Narwal



Delhi police has moved toward the Supreme Court testing the Delhi High Court request conceding bail to Asif Iqbal Tanha, Devangana Kalita and Natasha Narwal in a Delhi Riots case under the Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act. The extraordinary leave request (advance) was recorded on Wednesday morning against the judgment conveyed by seat of Justices Siddharth Mridul and Anup J Bhambhani on Tuesday.

The High Court had held that by all appearances, no offense under areas 15, 17 or 18 UAPA was made-out based on the material on record in the current argument against the three. The case relates to Delhi police test into the "larger conspiracy" that prompted the riots in the capital's North-East region in February 2020.

Asif Iqbal Tanha is an understudy seeking after his last year of B.A. (Hons.) (Persian) Program at Jamia Millia Islamia. He was captured in the Delhi riots case under UAPA in May 2020 and has been in ceaseless authority from that point forward. Natasha Narwal and Devangana Kalita are researchers at Jawaharlal Nehru University, who are related with the Pinjra Tod Collective. They have additionally been in care since May 2020. According to Delhi Police, following the Citizenship Amendement Act, Tanha, Kalita and Narwal, alongside other blamed people, planned to cause interruption of such a degree and such an extent at the public capital that would prompt scattering and unsettling influence of peace and lawfulness at a remarkable scale.

The High Court, while conceding bail to Kalita and Narwal, seen that the State, in its uneasiness to smother contradict, obscured the line between the unavoidably ensured right to dissent and fear based oppressor movement. "We are obliged to say, that it shows up, that in its uneasiness to smother contradict and in the sullen dread that matters may turn crazy, the State has obscured the line between the naturally ensured 'right to protest' and 'terrorist activity'. If such blurring gains traction, democracy would be in peril," the order said.